NBA Coach Mike Brown: Parents Need to Let Their Kids Lead Post-Game Conversations

The Golden State Warriors associate head coach says the best thing sports parents can do is give their child some space after a game or practice.

The car ride home after a practice or game can often be a one-sided conversation—the parent blurting out everything they wanted to tell their child during the action, and the kid sitting quietly in the passenger's seat. According to Golden State Warriors associate head coach Mike Brown, having these type of discussions on a regular basis can not only damage a youth athlete's love of the game, but also harm the relationship they have with their parent. Instead, Brown recommends parents allow young athletes to initiate post-game or post-practice conversations themselves.

"Over time, I saw that helped our relationship tremendously and he wanted to interact with me more and he didn't feel the pressure of 'I gotta hear it from Dad again, even though I really know what I'm doing.' If there's anything out there that I encourage you to do, after a practice or after a game, if you watched your kid play or perform, just give them some space—no matter what their personality is. I think that's a big thing and it can help your relationship going forward and help them continue to really love the sport they're in," Brown says. Brown, who has raised two sons to be college student-athletes, is speaking from experience. You can see his full answer on the topic in the video player above.

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Positive Coaching Alliance is dedicated to building Better Athletes, Better People and is a proud contributor to STACK.

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Topics: NBA | PARENTS | YOUTH BASKETBALL | YOUTH SPORTS | POSITIVE ATTITUDE | GOLDEN STATE WARRIORS | POSITIVE COACHING | POSITIVE COACHING ALLIANCE